My grandson Max has learned to say “hello”. I’m thinking we should do likewise. In my new book “How…

My grandson Max has learned to say “hello”. I’m thinking we should do likewise. In my new book “How…

My grandson Max has learned to say “hello”. I’m thinking we should do likewise. In my new book “How Happiness Happens”, we explore the “one another” verses in the New Testament. One of the most common is the most simple: “Greet one another” (Rom. 16:16).
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Why the big deal? Why should we be careful to greet one another?

Out of respect. Respect is a mindfulness of another’s person’s situation. Respect notices the new kid in class and says hello. Respect pauses at the desk of the receptionist and says, “Good morning.” Respect refuses to hurry through the check-out line without a genuine “Good afternoon” for the cashier. Respect removes her headphones and greets the fellow passenger, removes his hat to salute the competitor, and attempts to remove any awkwardness by welcoming the newcomer to the church.

British minister J.H. Jowett told the story of a convict from Darlington, England. He had just been released from three years in jail when he happened to pass the mayor on the street. Expecting nothing more than a ostracism from the public, he didn’t know how to respond when the mayor paused, tipped his hat, and asked in a cheery tone, “Hello. I’m glad to see you. How are you today?”

The ex-prisoner mumbled a response and went on his way. The city official thought nothing of it until years later the two accidentally met in another city. The mayor didn’t remember the man, but the man had never forgotten the mayor. He said, “I want to thank you for what you did for me when I came out of prison.”

“What did I do?”

“You spoke a kind word to me and changed my life.”

What is small to you may be huge to someone else.
Greet one another.

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